7 Ways to Overcome Scrapper’s Block

7WaystoOvercomeScrappersBlock
Ahhh! You managed to send the kids off to Grandma’s for the weekend, and your husband is golfing with his buddies for the afternoon, so you’ve got the house to yourself! You spread your photos and brand new scrapbook supplies out on the clean kitchen table, and you’re ready to start! But where???

Everybody experiences “scrapper’s block” sometimes, and it can pop up when you’re at a crop or scrapbook retreat with your friends just as easily as it does when you’re at home working on projects solo. I’ve put together a list of suggestions that have helped me bust through that block and move on to completing pages and projects, and I hope you find a couple here that work for you, too!

  1. Get Organized
    For me, clutter and disorganization are very unsettling, and I also tend to get cluttered and disorganized when I’m unsettled for any reason. (You can totally tell how zen I’m feeling by observing how clean my living room is.) I’m much more likely to efficiently produce pages I like if my photos are roughly in the order that I’m planning to use them, my tools are in their places so I can find them quickly, and my papers are easy to leaf through.
  2. Journal
    When I’m not quite sure how to put a set of pictures together, I like to think of the story behind them. I write down a few words–or even sometimes a few pages–about the backstory, the mood of the event, or anything else that might not be obvious to someone who just sees the pictures. This helps me decide what tones of paper to use (maybe blues for something more subdued and yellows or bright pink for something really upbeat), which pictures to make my focal point, how much embellishment I want to use, and what I want to journal on the page later.
  3. Don’t Start at the Beginning
    Sometimes I’ll try really hard to scrapbook something chronologically, and I just can’t think what to do with the beginning of the story. When this happens, instead of stressing over the fact that I’m wasting precious time, I just skip on to the next thing…or the one after that. I usually come to some bit of the trip or school year or whatever it is I’m documenting that is most interesting/fun for me, and then the ideas start to flow. Start with that compelling middle piece of the puzzle, and then you’ll find that you can build backwards and forwards from there.
  4. Switch Album Projects
    I usually have several different albums going at a time, so if I’m not feeling moved to create pages for one of them I’ll pull out a different one. (Right now I’m putting together a honeymoon album for me and my hubby and also another album for my youngest brother that’s documenting his LDS mission.)
  5. Play with Product
    When I can’t come up with a good layout, I will often give myself permission to just do something fun. It might be a card or some borders, or maybe there is a Pin I’ve been wanting to try out that would be a fun use of paper. After that, I usually feel a little better about my own creativity and ability to produce something fun.
  6. Forget about Perfection
    I think I got over this a long time ago, but I definitely see friends who struggle to commit to a page design or album idea because they’re not sure it’s “good enough.” The truth is, some of your pages won’t be pretty–I have some doozies in my own albums that would probably make you feel pretty good about your own “worst” pages. But complete albums that tell full stories are, in my opinion at least, much better than piles of supplies and photos waiting for the perfect page to come along.
  7. Play with Product
    When I can’t come up with a good layout, I will often give myself permission to just do something fun. It might be a card or some borders, or maybe there is a Pin I’ve been wanting to try out that would be a fun use of paper. After that, I usually feel a little better about my own creativity and ability to produce something fun.
  8. Take a Class
    Granted this isn’t really something you can do in the moment, if you find yourself regularly drawing a blank when you want to work on your albums, sign up for a class with your CM Advisor and maybe a friend or two. (Note: Not all advisors teach classes.) At a class, you’ll use different tools, products, and techniques than you’re used to, and this may inspire ideas in you that you didn’t have before.

 

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